1967 Ferrari 412P

Enzo Ferrari’s Secret Weapon

In the 1960’s, Enzo Ferrari frantically defended his speed empire. After a failed takeover attempt, Henry Ford III made it his mission to dethrone Ferrari on the European auto circuit, and Ferrari’s venerable position was under attack.

When you’re under pressure, you’re capable of genius — and madness. Ferrari threw everything but the kitchen sink at Ford to keep his fleet of Ferraris one step ahead — on the track, and in the pole position for auto enthusiasts everywhere.

The Ferrari 412P is the kitchen sink.

With the body of a 330, the 412P is almost a stealth weapon. The main difference between the 330 and the 412 is a two-valve, twin overhead cam engine. With a slightly shortened wheelbase, the 412P was easier to handle, and the 420 horsepower rocketed its 1700 pounds around the European tracks.

When this secret weapon was launched, Ford had to answer. What happened next? Find out, only one One of a Kind: Cars. Only on Velocity at 9:30.

When It Comes to Race Cars, Necessity is the Mother of Invention

by Eileen Marable

There’s nothing that a car loving gal like me likes more than finding out the history of some of the incredible finds in our shows.  While familiar with many of the bigger name models that ended up in mass production, I’ve got a long way to go before I’m schooled in the more rare finds out there.


This week the gang at One of a Kind give us a glimpse of the 57 Airbox Corvette and the Ferrari 412P…you’ll have to tune in to get the stories behind the amazing restorations, but here are the basic facts to get you in the mood.

‘57 Airbox Corvette

Man is this car sweet.  With its rounded lines visually it looks built for racing, even I can see that.  But the real hot stuff is under the hood.

According DZAUto, an expert on the Airbox Corvette over at Corvette Forums, the term “Airbox” came along when a design option was added on just 43 of the fuel injected cars from 1957.  (CLICK HERE FOR MORE)